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Healy, GM,Finn, DP,O'Gorman, DA,Maharaj, C,Raftery, M,Ruane, N,Mitchell, C,Sarma, K,Bohacek, M,McGuire, BE
2015
October
Pain Medicine
Pretreatment anxiety and pain acceptance are associated with response to trigger point injection therapy for chronic myofascial pain
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Chronic Pain Trigger Point Myofascial Anxiety Pain Acceptance LOW-BACK-PAIN PSYCHOLOGICAL PREDICTORS CATASTROPHIZING SCALE MULTIDISCIPLINARY REHABILITATION PHYSICIAN CONSULTATION STABILIZING EXERCISES MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN HOSPITAL ANXIETY CLINICAL-TRIALS LUMBAR SURGERY
16
1955
1966
Background and AimThis study examined the psychosocial profile of patients who responded or did not respond to trigger point injection therapy for chronic myofascial pain.MethodsSeventy one patients with a diagnosis of chronic myofascial pain of the paraspinous muscles completed a pretreatment questionnaire measuring demographic and social factors, and validated scales to assess pain intensity, pain interference (physical and emotional), and defined psychological characteristics (pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, pain self-efficacy, mood and anxiety). Trigger point injection therapy of the affected areas of myofascial pain was performed and follow-up was conducted by telephone at one week (n=65) and one month (n=63) post intervention to assess treatment outcome (pain intensity and pain-related physical interference).ResultsAt one week follow-up and one-month follow-up, using pain-related physical interference as the outcome measure, we found that those who responded well to treatment were characterized by a lower level of pretreatment anxiety and a higher level of pain acceptance, with anxiety being the strongest predictor.ConclusionThese results suggest that responses to interventional pain management in chronic myofascial paraspinous pain may be influenced by psychological characteristics, especially pretreatment anxiety.
10.1111/pme.12781
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