Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
O'Donnell, MJ,Mente, A,Smyth, A,Yusuf, S
2013
April
European Heart Journal
Salt intake and cardiovascular disease: why are the data inconsistent?
Published
Optional Fields
Salt Sodium Cardiovascular Prevention Population health URINARY SODIUM-EXCRETION CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE BLOOD-PRESSURE DIETARY-SODIUM POTASSIUM EXCRETION PUBLIC-HEALTH NONPHARMACOLOGIC INTERVENTIONS ELECTROLYTE EXCRETION MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION YANOMAMO INDIANS
34
1034
Effective population-based interventions are required to reduce the global burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Reducing salt intake has emerged as a leading target, with many guidelines recommending sodium intakes of 2.3 g/day or lower. These guideline thresholds are based largely on clinical trials reporting a reduction in blood pressure with low, compared with moderate, intake. However, no large-scale randomized trials have been conducted to determine the effect of low sodium intake on CV events. Prospective cohort studies evaluating the association between sodium intake and CV outcomes have been inconsistent and a number of recent studies have reported an association between low sodium intake (in the range recommended by current guidelines) and an increased risk of CV death. In the largest of these studies, a J-shaped association between sodium intake and CV death and heart failure was found. Despite a large body of research in this area, there are divergent interpretations of these data, with some advocating a re-evaluation of the current guideline recommendations. In this article, we explore potential reasons for the differing interpretations of existing evidence on the association between sodium intake and CVD. Similar to other areas in prevention, the controversy is likely to remain unresolved until large-scale definitive randomized controlled trials are conducted to determine the effect of low sodium intake (compared to moderate intake) on CVD incidence.
10.1093/eurheartj/ehs409
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