Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Ahmadian, R,Olbert, AI,Hartnett, M,Falconer, RA
2014
May
Computers & Geosciences
Sea level rise in the Severn Estuary and Bristol Channel and impacts of a Severn Barrage
Published
Altmetric: 3WOS: 8 ()
Optional Fields
Sea level rise Climate change Severn Barrage Flood risk Severn Estuary Marine renewable energy COASTAL FLOOD RISK EASTERN IRISH SEA CLIMATE-CHANGE STORM SURGES UNITED-KINGDOM MODEL UK OCEAN VARIABILITY CIRCULATION
66
94
105
Many research projects in recent years have focused on marine renewable energy devices and structures due to the growing interest in marine renewable energy. These devices and structures have very different life spans. Schemes such as the Severn Barrage in the UK, as originally proposed by the Severn Tidal Power Group (STPG), would be the largest tidal renewable energy generation project in the world and would be operational for well over a century if built. Due to the long working life of some of these marine renewable energy schemes, it is important to study the impacts of climate change on such schemes, and particularly sea level rise. This study focuses on investigating the impacts of sea level rise due to climate change on the largest macro-tidal estuary in the UK, namely the Severn Estuary and Bristol Channel, and the alterations of the impacts and the performance of the Severn Barrage as a result of climate change. A hierarchy of computer models was implemented to identify the more localised impacts of climate change in the region of the study. Moreover, the potential benefits of the barrage on reducing flood risk, as well as the impact of climate change and the barrage on intertidal mudflats were investigated. The model predictions showed that the barrage would reduce flood risk due to the sea level rise. Furthermore, annual power output and the initial reduction in flood risk of the barrage would not be affected by sea level rise. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
10.1016/j.cageo.2013.12.011
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