Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
O'Leary, ED,Howard, S,Hughes, BM,James, JE
2013
October
International Journal Of Psychophysiology
An experimental test of blunting using sleep-restriction as an acute stressor in Type D and non-Type D women
Published
()
Optional Fields
Blunting Cardiovascular reactivity Type D personality Sleep restriction Vascular response D PERSONALITY CARDIOVASCULAR REACTIVITY INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS DIETARY CAFFEINE HEMODYNAMIC PROFILE CORTISOL RESPONSES PRESSURE DISEASE
90
37
43
Recent years have seen a growing interest in evidence indicating that a low, or blunted, cardiovascular response to stress may predict increased risk for a range of adverse health outcomes. Type D personality has been associated with poor health in cardiac patients, and more recently, has been associated with lower reactivity to laboratory stress in healthy individuals, underpinned by an increase in vascular responding. Previous findings have also demonstrated that partial sleep restriction is characterised by a robust vascular profile. However, despite the fact that a vascular response profile underpins both reactivity in sleep restricted adults and blunted reactivity in healthy Type D adults, limited empirical work has examined the correlates of sleep restriction and Type D. The present study sought to investigate if manipulation of sleep duration in healthy Type D and non-Type D individuals would alter cardiovascular reactivity to stress, and in particular whether such manipulation could elucidate the comparative nature of blunting. Seventy female university students completed a laboratory social stress task while undergoing continuous hemodynamic monitoring, after either a night of partial sleep restriction or a full night's rest. In both groups, Type D participants exhibited relatively low SBP stress responses, consistent with the view that at-risk groups show blunting in (some indices of) cardiovascular reactivity. For non-Type D participants, low SBP responses were observed only in participants who had undergone sleep restriction, suggesting that sleep-restriction served as an environmental stressor which precipitated in non-Type D persons a cardiovascular stress response resembling that ordinarily seen in Type D persons. This blunted response was associated with an increase in vascular responding. Thus, the findings suggest that blunting is characterised not only by reductions in some (frequently studied) cardiovascular parameters, but also by increases in others. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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