Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
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Sulpice, R.,Gibon, Y.,Cornic, G.,Larher, F. R.
2002
December
Interaction between exogenous glycine betaine and the photorespiratory pathway in canola leaf discs
Published
()
Optional Fields
116
44
460
467
The uptake and accumulation of exogenously supplied glycine betaine (GB) by canola (which never accumulates GB in response to stress) leaf discs has been found to induce damage to some of their structural and functional components. As a consequence some free amino acids were accumulated, particularly glutamine and glycine. Similar results were obtained with leaf discs of Arabidopsis thaliana i.e. another cruciferous plant that does not naturally produce significant amounts of GB. In contrast no changes in glutamine and glycine contents were observed in response to the GB treatment in leaf discs of spinach, a natural producer of GB. The change in glutamine content might be related to the senescing effects caused by the GB treatment. Glycine accumulation in response to GB has been more thoroughly studied with canola leaf discs. It only occurred under light conditions and was suppressed under non-photorespiratory conditions. The accumulation of glycine in canola leaf discs in response to GB was either restricted when GB was added in the presence of aminooxyacetate (an inhibitor of transaminases) or enhanced when added in the presence of aminoacetonitrile (an inhibitor of glycine decarboxylation by mitochondria). Both compounds are known to block the glycolate pathway. Glycine accumulation was not found in leaf discs of Zea mays treated in the light in the presence of GB. These results suggest that the absorbed GB could exert destabilizing effects on the photorespiration of the C-3 cruciferous plants canola and Arabidopsis via competitive effects between GB and glycine at the mitochondrial step of the glycolate pathway. The mechanism of the GB effect remains to be elucidated as well as that of its apparent compatibility in spinach, the well known natural producer of GB.The uptake and accumulation of exogenously supplied glycine betaine (GB) by canola (which never accumulates GB in response to stress) leaf discs has been found to induce damage to some of their structural and functional components. As a consequence some free amino acids were accumulated, particularly glutamine and glycine. Similar results were obtained with leaf discs of Arabidopsis thaliana i.e. another cruciferous plant that does not naturally produce significant amounts of GB. In contrast no changes in glutamine and glycine contents were observed in response to the GB treatment in leaf discs of spinach, a natural producer of GB. The change in glutamine content might be related to the senescing effects caused by the GB treatment. Glycine accumulation in response to GB has been more thoroughly studied with canola leaf discs. It only occurred under light conditions and was suppressed under non-photorespiratory conditions. The accumulation of glycine in canola leaf discs in response to GB was either restricted when GB was added in the presence of aminooxyacetate (an inhibitor of transaminases) or enhanced when added in the presence of aminoacetonitrile (an inhibitor of glycine decarboxylation by mitochondria). Both compounds are known to block the glycolate pathway. Glycine accumulation was not found in leaf discs of Zea mays treated in the light in the presence of GB. These results suggest that the absorbed GB could exert destabilizing effects on the photorespiration of the C-3 cruciferous plants canola and Arabidopsis via competitive effects between GB and glycine at the mitochondrial step of the glycolate pathway. The mechanism of the GB effect remains to be elucidated as well as that of its apparent compatibility in spinach, the well known natural producer of GB.
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