Conference Contribution Details
Mandatory Fields
Hogan, M. J., Broome, B., Noone, C.
Wellbeing in Ireland Conference: Overcoming barriers to Wellbeing in Ireland
This conference had four objectives: (1) Establish a new national network of scientists, community organizations, policy-makers, and other key stakeholders to discuss the latest advances in well-being research and policy; (2) Introduce conference participants to Interactive Management, a collaborative systems design methodology. (3) Foster a dialogue on barriers to well-being in Ireland and develop a systems model describing how barriers to well-being in Ireland are related. (4) Use Interactive Management systems design methods to agree a set of high-impact, feasible options to overcome barriers to well-being in Ireland
NUI, Galway
Conference Organising Committee Chairperson
Optional Fields
08-JUN-12
08-JUN-12
Internationally, there is increasing interest in, and analysis of, human well-being and the economic, social, environmental and psychological factors that contribute to it. Current thinking suggests that to measure social progress and national well-being we need something more than GDP.  There is a wider question of what matters in life, and the ongoing debate about individual and societal wellbeing seeks to address this question.  The purpose of the Well-being in Ireland conference was to bring scientists, community organizations and policy-makers together to discuss the latest advances in well-being research and policy.  The meeting was organised by Michael Hogan in collaboration with Chris Noone (NUI, Galway) and Professor Benjamin Broome (Arizona State University).  Helen Johnson, author of the Well-being in Ireland Report (NESC, 2009) and Alex Zautra, Arizona State University, delivered keynote papers on well-being. In organizing our conference we had four objectives:  (1) Establish a new national network of scientists, community organizations, policy-makers, and other key stakeholders to discuss the latest advances in well-being research and policy; (2) Introduce conference participants to Interactive Management, a collaborative systems design methodology. (3) Foster a dialogue on barriers to well-being in Ireland and develop a systems model describing how barriers to well-being in Ireland are related. (4) Use Interactive Management systems design methods to agree a set of high-impact, feasible options to overcome barriers to well-being in Ireland. A report detailing the results of the collective intelligence sessions was published and major feature on barriers to wellbeing in Ireland was published in the Irish Times. 
Publication Themes