Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Allegrante, John P; Barry, Margaret M; Auld, M Elaine; Lamarre, Marie-Claude
2012
December
Health Education & Behavior
Galway Revisited: Tracking Global Progress in Core Competencies and Quality Assurance for Health Education and Health Promotion
Published
()
Optional Fields
39
6
643
647
Perhaps not since John Snow removed the Broad Street pump handle and stemmed the cholera outbreak in London in 1854, or William Henry Welch and Wickliffe Rose out- lined the shape of an “institute of hygiene” in the Welch– Rose Report of 1915, thus founding the modern public health movement in the United States (Fee & Acheson, 1991), has public health and the many disciplines that contribute to its work undergone more rapid transformation than what we are witnessing today. That transformation is global, and the rap- idly evolving nature and complexity of public health prob- lems that we confront in the 21st century, together with the equally breathtaking evidence base of science now available to address these problems, have created new imperatives for ensuring that modern public health professionals possess the competencies that will enable them to practice effectively. Calls from the Institute of Medicine (2002a, 2002b, 2012) in the United States, the World Health Organization (WHO, Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, 2008; WHO, 2011), and others (e.g., International Union for Health Promotion and Education [IUHPE] & Canadian Consortium for Health Promotion Research, 2007; Livingood et al., 2011; Tulchinsky & McKee, 2011) have all pointed to the need to improve public health workforce capacity in order to meet contemporary challenges, along with the attendant implications for professional education. Nowhere is the need to ensure the quality of practice more urgent, nor more critical, than in health promotion, the core function of public health that focuses on using educational, behavioral, and organizational strategies to assist individuals and groups to engage in health-promoting behavior and pol- icy changes that can improve population health. The chal- lenges and the opportunities to underpin health promotion and health education practitioners with new knowledge, abilities, and skills have broadened our thinking about qual- ity assurance and catalyzed a new generation of efforts to strengthen professional preparation, standards, and creden- tialing in North America and throughout Europe, as well as in other regions and countries of the world such as Australia, Canada, Latin America, and New Zealand. The Galway Consensus Conference was the first effort to explore international collaboration on workforce develop- ment and global credentialing in health education and health promotion. Organized and convened in 2008 by the IUHPE, Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the vision under- lying the Galway Consensus Conference was to identify the domains of core competency for health education and health promotion that would be universal (Allegrante, Barry, Auld, Lamarre, & Taub, 2009; Barry, Allegrante, Lamarre, Auld, & Taub, 2009). The time was right for such an effort because of the convergence of a number of factors, namely, • concern over the growing global nature of public health threats, including the rise in noncommuni- cable diseases with epidemics of type II diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity, as well as mortality and morbidity due to persistent infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and associated with a range of new communicable diseases (e.g., swine flu) that have transcended boundaries because of increased global commerce and transport; • publication of the United Nations (2000) Millen- nium Development Goals; • new research findings elucidating the role of the social determinants of health (World Health Orga- nization, Commission on Social Determinants of Health, 2008); • new technologies that permit rapid communications and data sharing; and • the devolution and realignment of governments globally in response to new political and economic realities. Perhaps not since John Snow removed the Broad Street pump handle and stemmed the cholera outbreak in London in 1854, or William Henry Welch and Wickliffe Rose outlined the shape of an “institute of hygiene” in the Welch–Rose Report of 1915, thus founding the modern public health movement in the United States (Fee & Acheson, 1991), has public health and the many disciplines that contribute to its work undergone more rapid transformation than what we are witnessing today. That transformation is global, and the rapidly evolving nature and complexity of public health problems that we confront in the 21st century, together with the equally breathtaking evidence base of science now available to address these problems, have created new imperatives for ensuring that modern public health professionals possess the competencies that will enable them to practice effectively. Calls from theInstitute of Medicine (2002a, 2002b, 2012) in the United States, the World Health Organization (WHO, Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, 2008; WHO, 2011), and others (e.g., International Union for Health Promotion and Education [IUHPE] & Canadian Consortium for Health Promotion Research, 2007; Livingood et al., 2011; Tulchinsky & McKee, 2011) have all pointed to the need to improve public health workforce capacity in order to meet contemporary challenges, along with the attendant implications for professional education.Nowhere is the need to ensure the quality of practice more urgent, nor more critical, than in health promotion, the core function of public health that focuses on using educational, behavioral, and organizational strategies to assist individuals and groups to engage in health-promoting behavior and policy changes that can improve population health. The challenges and the opportunities to underpin health promotion and health education practitioners with new knowledge, abilities, and skills have broadened our thinking about quality assurance …
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1090198112465089
10.1177/1090198112465089
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