Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Sezgin, D;O'Caoimh, R;Liew, A;O'Donovan, MR;Illario, M;Salem, MA;Kennelly, S;Carriazo, AM;Lopez-Samaniego, L;Carda, CA;Rodriguez-Acuna, R;Inzitari, M;Hammar, T;Hendry, A
2020
August
European Geriatric Medicine
The effectiveness of intermediate care including transitional care interventions on function, healthcare utilisation and costs: a scoping review
Published
Optional Fields
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL DISCHARGE-PLANNING INTERVENTION HOME INTEGRATED CARE TELEPHONE FOLLOW-UP OLDER-ADULTS EMERGENCY-DEPARTMENT HOSPITAL READMISSION SOCIAL-WORK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ELDERLY-PATIENTS
Key summary pointsAim This scoping review examined the effectiveness of intermediate care including transitional care interventions for middle-aged and older adults on function, healthcare utilisation, and costs. Findings While some studies report positive outcomes on hospital utilisation, the evidence is limited for their effectiveness on emergency department attendances, institutionalisation, function, and cost-effectiveness. Message Intermediate care including transitional care interventions were associated with reduced hospital stay but this finding was not universal.Background and aim Intermediate care describes services, including transitional care, that support the needs of middle-aged and older adults during care transitions and between different settings. This scoping review aimed to examine the effectiveness of intermediate care including transitional care interventions for middle-aged and older adults on function, healthcare utilisation, and costs. Design A scoping review of the literature was conducted including studies published between 2002 and 2019 with a transitional care and/or intermediate care intervention for adults aged >= 50. Searches were performed in CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Open Grey and PubMed databases. Qualitative and quantitative approaches were employed for data synthesis. Results In all, 133 studies were included. Interventions were grouped under four models of care: (a) Hospital-based transitional care (n = 8), (b) Transitional care delivered at discharge and up to 30 days after discharge (n = 70), (c) Intermediate care at home (n = 41), and (d) Intermediate care delivered in a community hospital, care home or post-acute facility (n = 14). While these models were associated with a reduced hospital stay, this was not universal. Intermediate including transitional care services combined with telephone follow-up and coaching support were reported to reduce short and long-term hospital re-admissions. Evidence for improved ADL function was strongest for intermediate care delivered by an interdisciplinary team with rehabilitation at home. Study design and types of interventions were markedly heterogenous, limiting comparability. Conclusions Although many studies report that intermediate care including transitional care models reduce hospital utilisation, results were mixed. There is limited evidence for the effectiveness of these services on function, institutionalisation, emergency department attendances, or on cost-effectiveness.
1878-7649
10.1007/s41999-020-00365-4
Grant Details
Publication Themes