Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Doogue, R;McCann, D;Fitzgerald, N;Murphy, AW;Glynn, LG;Hayes, P
2020
July
BMC Family Practice
Blood pressure control in patients with a previous stroke/transient ischaemic attack in primary care in Ireland: a cross sectional study
Published
Optional Fields
STROKE HYPERTENSION MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION PREVENTION PREVALENCE OFFICE EUROPE
21
BackgroundUncontrolled blood pressure (BP) is an important modifiable risk factor for recurrent stroke. Secondary prevention measures when implemented can reduce stroke re-occurrence by 80%. However, hypertension control rates remain sub-optimal, and little data is available from primary care where most management occurs.The aim of this study was to describe BP control in primary care-based patients with a previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) in Ireland, and to concurrently examine antihypertensive medication-dosing.MethodsStudy participants most recent office-based BP reading was compared with the NICE (NG136) and European Society of Hypertension/ European Society of Cardiology (ESH/ESC 2013) goal of BP <140/90mmHg. Optimal anti-hypertensive medication dosing was determined by benchmarking prescribed doses for each drug with the World Health Organisation-Defined Daily Dosing (WHO-DDD) recommendations.ResultsWe identified 328 patients with a previous stroke or TIA in 10 practices. Blood pressure was controlled in almost two thirds of patients when measured against the ESH/ESC and NICE guidelines (63.1%, n=207). Of those with BP 140/90 (n=116), just under half (n=44, 47.3%) were adequately dosed in all anti-hypertensive medications when compared with the WHO-DDD recommendations.ConclusionBlood pressure control in patients post stroke/TIA appears sub-optimal in over one third of patients. A comparison of drug doses with WHO-DDD recommendations suggests that 47% of patients may benefit from drug-dose improvements. Further work is required to assess how best to manage blood pressure in patients with a previous stroke or TIA in Primary Care, as most consultations for hypertension take place in this setting.
1471-2296
10.1186/s12875-020-01211-z
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