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Liang, B,Tikhanovich, I,Nasheuer, HP,Folk, WR
2012
March
J Virol
Stimulation of BK Virus DNA Replication by NFI Family Transcription Factors
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Optional Fields
NUCLEAR FACTOR-I HUMAN POLYOMAVIRUS BK NONCODING CONTROL REGION POLYMERASE-ALPHA-PRIMASE HUMAN PAPOVAVIRUS-BK PROTEIN-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS RENAL-TRANSPLANT PATIENTS LINKER SCAN ANALYSIS GROWTH-FACTOR-BETA LARGE T-ANTIGEN
86
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3275
BK polyomavirus (BKV) establishes persistent, low-level, and asymptomatic infections in most humans and causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN) and other pathologies in some individuals. The activation of BKV replication following kidney transplantation, leading to viruria, viremia, and, ultimately, PVAN, is associated with immune suppression as well as inflammation and stress from ischemia-reperfusion injury of the allograft, but the stimuli and molecular mechanisms leading to these pathologies are not well defined. The replication of BKV DNA in cell cultures is regulated by the viral noncoding control region (NCCR) comprising the core origin and flanking sequences, to which BKV T antigen (Tag), cellular proteins, and small regulatory RNAs bind. Six nuclear factor I (NFI) binding sites occur in sequences flanking the late side of the core origin (the enhancer) of the archetype virus, and their mutation, either individually or in toto, reduces BKV DNA replication when placed in competition with templates containing intact BKV NCCRs. NFI family members interacted with the helicase domain of BKV Tag in pulldown assays, suggesting that NFI helps recruit Tag to the viral core origin and may modulate its function. However, Tag may not be the sole target of the replication-modulatory activities of NFI: the NFIC/CTF1 isotype stimulates BKV template replication in vitro at low concentrations of DNA polymerase-alpha primase (Pol-primase), and the p58 subunit of Pol-primase associates with NFIC/CTF1, suggesting that NFI also recruits Pol-primase to the NCCR. These results suggest that NFI proteins (and the signaling pathways that target them) activate BKV replication and contribute to the consequent pathologies caused by acute infection.
DOI 10.1128/JVI.06369-11
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