Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Geary, RL;Haddad, T;Barry, A;Zuchora, A;McLaughlin, R;Kerin, M;Sullivan, FJ;Martin, J
2020
May
Irish Journal of Medical Science
A prospective feasibility study of MammoSite accelerated partial breast irradiation for early breast Cancer
Published
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Optional Fields
20-YEAR FOLLOW-UP CONSERVING SURGERY AMERICAN SOCIETY TREATMENT EFFICACY RADIATION-THERAPY BRACHYTHERAPY WOMEN RADIOTHERAPY MASTECTOMY OLDER
Background Accelerated partial breast irradiation is a potential alternative to standard whole breast irradiation, following breast-conserving surgery, in the management of breast cancer. The MammoSite applicator-based technique allows for the delivery of a higher dose of radiation to the tumour bed and adjacent area, over a shorter treatment period. Aims To investigate the long-term feasibility of the MammoSite technique in early stage breast cancer in an Irish cohort. Methods Sixty-two patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in this prospective study between November 2005 and October 2012 at the University Hospital Galway. A single-entry MammoSite applicator was inserted post-operatively. A CT scan was performed to assess the balloon to skin distance, the conformance of target tissue to balloon surface and balloon symmetry. A total dose of 34 Gy was delivered over 10 fractions twice daily. Results Median follow-up was 10 years. 91.9% (57/62) completed the full course of MammoSite treatment. Technical issues with the MammoSite balloon precluded three patients from completing the full course of treatment. On last follow-up, 6.4% (4/62) of patients had developed an ipsilateral breast recurrence. Half of these recurrences occurred more than 10 years after the initial breast cancer treatment. The most common toxicities observed were fibrosis (67.7%), pain (61.3%) and skin erythema (35.5%). Conclusion The use of the MammoSite technique, as an alternative to standard whole breast irradiation, is feasible in a typical Irish clinical setting with integrated multidisciplinary team input.
0021-1265
10.1007/s11845-020-02237-z
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