Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Dowling, EP;Ronan, W;Ofek, G;Deshpande, VS;McMeeking, RM;Athanasiou, KA;McGarry, JP
2012
December
Journal Of The Royal Society Interface
The effect of remodelling and contractility of the actin cytoskeleton on the shear resistance of single cells: a computational and experimental investigation
Published
Altmetric: 1WOS: 26 ()
Optional Fields
GENE-EXPRESSION CHONDROCYTE CYTOSKELETON MICROPIPETTE ASPIRATION VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES MECHANICAL COMPRESSION CONFOCAL ANALYSIS ORGANIZATION DEFORMATION CARTILAGE BIOMECHANICS
9
3469
3479
The biomechanisms that govern the response of chondrocytes to mechanical stimuli are poorly understood. In this study, a series of in vitro tests are performed, in which single chondrocytes are subjected to shear deformation by a horizontally moving probe. Dramatically different probe force-indentation curves are obtained for untreated cells and for cells in which the actin cytoskeleton has been disrupted. Untreated cells exhibit a rapid increase in force upon probe contact followed by yielding behaviour. Cells in which the contractile actin cytoskeleton was removed exhibit a linear force-indentation response. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this behaviour, a three-dimensional active modelling framework incorporating stress fibre (SF) remodelling and contractility is used to simulate the in vitro tests. Simulations reveal that the characteristic force-indentation curve observed for untreated chondrocytes occurs as a result of two factors: (i) yielding of SFs due to stretching of the cytoplasm near the probe and (ii) dissociation of SFs due to reduced cytoplasm tension at the front of the cell. In contrast, a passive hyperelastic model predicts a linear force-indentation curve similar to that observed for cells in which the actin cytoskeleton has been disrupted. This combined modelling-experimental study offers a novel insight into the role of the active contractility and remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton in the response of chondrocytes to mechanical loading.
1742-5689
10.1098/rsif.2012.0428
Grant Details
Publication Themes