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Reviews
Fallon, A;Van der Putten, D;Dring, C;Moylett, EH;Fealy, G;Devane, D
2016
January
Baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding for successful breastfeeding
Published
1
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MOTHERS NURSING BEHAVIOR EARLY POSTPARTUM PERIOD EARLY INITIATION NIPPLE PAIN MILK-PRODUCTION TERM INFANTS WEIGHT-GAIN 10 STEPS FREQUENCY DURATION
BackgroundBaby-led breastfeeding is recommended as best practice in determining the frequency and duration of a breastfeed. An alternative approach is described as scheduled, where breastfeeding is timed and restricted in frequency and duration. It is necessary to review the evidence that supports current recommendations, so that women are provided with high-quality evidence to inform their feeding decisions.ObjectivesTo evaluate the effects of baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding for successful breastfeeding, for healthy newborns.Search methodsWe searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (23 February 2016), CINAHL (1981 to 23 February 2016), EThOS, Index to Theses and ProQuest database and World Health Organization's 1998 evidence to support the 'Ten Steps' to successful breastfeeding (10 May 2016).Selection criteriaWe planned to include randomised and quasi-randomised trials with randomisation at both the individual and cluster level. Studies presented in abstract form would have been eligible for inclusion if sufficient data were available. Studies using a cross-over design would not have been eligible for inclusion.Data collection and analysisTwo review authors independently assessed for inclusion all potential studies we identified as a result of the search strategy. We would have resolved any disagreement through discussion or, if required, consulted a third review author, but this was not necessary.Main resultsNo studies were identified that were eligible for inclusion in this review.Authors' conclusionsThis review demonstrates that there is no evidence from randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding for successful breastfeeding, for healthy newborns. It is recommended that no changes are made to current practice guidelines without undertaking robust research, to include many patterns of breastfeeding and not limited to baby-led and scheduled breastfeeding. Future exploratory research is needed on baby-led breastfeeding that takes the mother's perspective into consideration.
HOBOKEN
WILEY
1469-493X
10.1002/14651858.CD009067.pub3
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