Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Moroney, NC;Wan, AHL;Soler-Vila, A;FitzGerald, RD;Johnson, MP;Kerry, JP
2015
March
Journal Of The Science Of Food And Agriculture
Inclusion of Palmaria palmata (red seaweed) in Atlantic salmon diets: effects on the quality, shelf-life parameters and sensory properties of fresh and cooked salmon fillets
Published
Altmetric: 4WOS: 5 ()
Optional Fields
FISH PATHOGENIC BACTERIA FLESH QUALITY SALAR PIGMENTS MARINE ASTAXANTHIN CAROTENOIDS ALGAE DULSE COLOR
95
897
905
BACKGROUNDThe use of Palmaria palmata (PP) as a natural ingredient in farmed Atlantic salmon diets was investigated. The effect of salmon diet supplementation with P. palmata (0, 5, 10 and 15%) or synthetic astaxanthin (positive control, PC) for 16 weeks pre-slaughter on quality indices of fresh salmon fillets was examined. The susceptibility of salmon fillets/homogenates to oxidative stress conditions was also measured. RESULTSIn salmon fillets stored in modified atmosphere packs (60% N-2/40% CO2) for up to 15 days at 4 degrees C, P. palmata increased surface -a* (greenness) and b* (yellowness) values in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a final yellow/orange flesh colour. In general, the dietary addition of P. palmata had no effect on pH, lipid oxidation (fresh, cooked and fillet homogenates) and microbiological status. Eating quality' sensory descriptors (texture, odour and oxidation flavour) in cooked salmon fillets were not influenced by dietary P. palmata. Salmon fed 5% PP showed increased overall acceptability compared with those fed PC and 0% PP. CONCLUSIONDietary P. palmata was ineffective at providing red coloration in salmon fillets, but pigment deposition enhanced fillets with a yellow/orange colour. Carotenoids from P. palmata may prove to be a natural pigment alternative to canthaxanthin in salmon feeds. (c) 2014 Society of Chemical Industry
0022-5142
10.1002/jsfa.6753
Grant Details
Publication Themes
Environment, Marine and Energy