Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Finn, E,Morrison, TG,McGuire, BE
2018
May
Pain Medicine
Correlates of Sexual Functioning and Relationship Satisfaction Among Men and Women Experiencing Chronic Pain
Published
WOS: 2 ()
Optional Fields
Sexual Functioning Chronic Pain Depression Body Image Self-esteem FATIGUE SEVERITY SCALE ROSENBERG SELF-ESTEEM DEPRESSION SCALE HOSPITAL ANXIETY CATASTROPHIZING SCALE CONSTRUCT-VALIDITY CANCER-PATIENTS RATING-SCALES UNITED-STATES PELVIC PAIN
19
942
954
Background. The aims of the study were to 1) examine the prevalence of sexual functioning difficulties in a chronic pain sample; 2) identify correlates of sexual functioning and relationship satisfaction utilizing pain variables (pain severity and pain interference) and psychological variables (mood, pain-related cognitions, self-efficacy, self-esteem, body-image); and 3) investigate possible sex differences in the correlates of sexual functioning and relationship satisfaction.Method. Two hundred sixty-nine participants were recruited online from chronic pain organizations, websites, social media sites, and discussion forums. Those who met criteria for inclusion were presented with a variety of measures related to pain, sexual functioning, and relationship satisfaction (for those in a relationship), as well as cognitive and affective variables. Results. Participant mean age was 37 years, and the majority were female, heterosexual, and currently in a relationship. High levels of pain severity and interference from pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, stress, and body image concerns were reported, along with low levels of self-esteem and pain self-efficacy. In addition, substantial proportions of male (43%) and female (48%) respondents had scores indicative of sexual problems. Exploratory hierarchical regression analyses revealed that, for women, age and relationship satisfaction (which were both treated as covariates) as well as depression emerged as statistically significant correlates of sexual functioning (i.e., women who were older and reported greater levels of depression and less satisfaction with their current relationship indicated poorer sexual functioning). When relationship satisfaction was the criterion measure, age and sexual functioning (again, treated as covariates) and perceived stress emerged as significant (i.e., women who were older, reported poorer sexual functioning, and reported greater perceived stress also indicated being less satisfied with their current relationship). For male participants, age emerged as the only statistically significant correlate of sexual functioning (i.e., older men reported poorer functioning). In terms of relationship satisfaction, self-esteem was the lone significant correlate variable (men who reported lower self-esteem also were less satisfied with their current relationship).Conclusions. Some sex differences were evident in the variables that predict sexual difficulties and relationship satisfaction among those suffering from chronic pain. Of note is that when psychological variables were considered, pain-specific physical variables (e.g., pain severity and activity limitations) accounted for very little additional variance.
10.1093/pm/pnx056
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