Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
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Chan, JCY,Burugapalli, K,Huang, YS,Kelly, JL,Pandit, A
2018
June
Tissue Engineering Part A
Cross-Linked Cholecyst-Derived Extracellular Matrix for Abdominal Wall Repair
Published
Optional Fields
carbodiimide cross-linking cholecyst-derived extracullar matrix abominal wall repair rabbit animal model mesh stretching INGUINAL-HERNIA REPAIR ACELLULAR DERMAL MATRIX POLYPROPYLENE-MESH MODIFICATIONS RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL HIGH-RISK PATIENTS TERM-FOLLOW-UP INCISIONAL HERNIA ADHESION FORMATION IN-VIVO BIOLOGIC MESH
Abdominal wall repair frequently utilizes either nondegradable or biodegradable meshes, which are found to stimulate undesirable biological tissue responses or which possess suboptimal degradation rate. In this study, a biologic mesh prototype made from carbodiimide cross-linked cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix (EDCxCEM) was compared with small intestinal submucosa (Surgisis((R))), cross-linked bovine pericardium (Peri-Guard((R))), and polypropylene (Prolene((R))) meshes in an in vivo rabbit model. The macroscopic appearance and stereological parameters of the meshes were evaluated. Tailoring the degradation of the EDCxCEM mesh prevents untimely degradation, while allowing cellular infiltration and mesh remodeling to take place in a slower but predictable manner. The results suggest that the cross-linked biodegradable cholecyst-derived biologic mesh results in no seroma formation, low adhesion, and moderate stretching of the mesh. In contrast to Surgisis, Peri-Guard, and Prolene meshes, the EDCxCEM mesh showed a statistically significant increase in the volume fraction (V-v) of collagen (from 34% to 52.1%) in the central fibrous tissue region at both day 28 and 56. The statistically high length density (L-v), of blood vessels for the EDCxCEM mesh at 28 days was reflected also by the higher cellular activity (high V-v of fibroblast and moderate V-v of nuclei) indicating remodeling of this region in the vicinity of a slowly degrading EDCxCEM mesh. The lack of mesh area stretching/shrinkage in the EDCxCEM mesh showed that the remodeled tissue was adequate to prevent hernia formation. The stereo-histological assays suggest that the EDCxCEM delayed degradation profile supports host wound healing processes including collagen formation, cellular infiltration, and angiogenesis. The use of cross-linked CEM for abdominal wall repair is promising.
10.1089/ten.tea.2017.0379
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