Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Matvienko-Sikar, K;Byrne, M;Kelly, C;Toomey, E;Hennessy, M;Devane, D;Heary, C;Harrington, J;McGrath, N;Queally, M;Kearney, PM
2017
October
Trials
Development of an infant feeding core outcome set for childhood obesity interventions: study protocol
Published
()
Optional Fields
ADULT OBESITY METAANALYSIS CHILDREN
18
Background: Childhood obesity is a significant public health challenge that affects approximately one in five children worldwide. Infant feeding practices are implicated in the aetiology of childhood obesity. Infant feeding interventions for childhood obesity are increasingly popular but outcome reporting is inconsistent across trials. Lack of standardisation limits examination of intervention effects and mechanisms of change. The aim of the current project is to develop a core set of infant feeding outcomes for children <= 1 year old, to be evaluated in childhood obesity intervention trials. Methods: This project will use similar methodology to previous core outcome development research. An infant feeding core outcome set (COS) will be developed in four stages: (1) a systematic review of the literature, (2) discussion and clarification of outcomes in a meeting involving multiple stakeholder perspectives, (3) prioritisation of outcomes using the Delphi technique with an expert panel of stakeholders, and (4) achieving consensus on the COS using the nominal group technique (NGT) consensus meeting. An online Delphi survey will be conducted following the NGT meeting to prioritise outcomes identified in the systematic review. An NGT meeting will be conducted with groups of health professionals, non-clinician researchers, and parents of infants <= 1 year old, to achieve final consensus on the infant feeding COS. Discussion: This study aims to develop a core outcome set of infant feeding outcomes for randomised infant feeding studies to prevent childhood obesity. This research will improve examination and syntheses of the outcomes of such studies to prevent and reduce childhood obesity.
1745-6215
10.1186/s13063-017-2180-4
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