Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Cullinan J, Hynes S, O'Donoghue C
2011
February
Ecological Economics
Using Spatial Microsimulation to Account for Demographic and Spatial Factors in Environmental Benefit Transfer
Published
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Optional Fields
Environmental benefit transfer Spatial microsimulation GIS Network analysis Travel cost model Forest recreation GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION-SYSTEMS ENDOGENOUS STRATIFICATION RECREATION DEMAND MODELING DEMAND TRUNCATION SERVICES ISSUES VALUES GIS
70
813
824
This paper presents a simulation-based modelling approach for estimating total visitor numbers and amenity values for prospective non-priced open-access outdoor recreation sites. To begin, the geographic extent of the market for recreation at a policy site is estimated using data from a similar study site. The population residing within this geographic area is simulated using a spatial microsimulation model and GIS techniques and an individual-level 'visitor arrival function' is then transferred across this simulated population. This allows the latent demand for visits to the policy site by each simulated individual to be predicted and summed, providing an estimate of the total potential demand for recreation at the site. Combining this with an economic value measure of a visit provides an estimate of the potential amenity value of the policy site. The approach is applied to Moyode Wood, a small-scale forest in the West of Ireland. and estimates the potential total economic value of recreation at (sic)0.4 million for the site. The research represents the first time that spatial microsimulation has been used in environmental benefit transfer and shows how it can be used to control for differences in demographic and spatial factors between study and policy sites. It also demonstrates how individual-level single-site travel cost models estimated using on-site survey data can be used to predict demand at alternative policy sites. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
DOI 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2010.12.003
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