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Facchini, MC,Decesari, S,Rinaldi, M,Carbone, C,Finessi, E,Mircea, M,Fuzzi, S,Moretti, F,Tagliavini, E,Ceburnis, D,O'Dowd, CD
2008
December
Environmental Science & Technology
Important Source of Marine Secondary Organic Aerosol from Biogenic Amines
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DICARBOXYLIC-ACIDS ALIPHATIC-AMINES FINE PARTICLES ARABIAN SEA NITROGEN OCEAN DISTRIBUTIONS METHYLAMINES ATMOSPHERE AMMONIUM
42
9116
9121
Relevant concentrations of dimethyl- and diethylammonium salts(DMA(+) and DEA(+))were measured in submicrometer marine aerosol collected over the North Atlantic during periods of high biological activity (HBA) in clean air masses (median concentration (minimum-maximum) = 26 (6-56) ng m(-3)). Much lower concentrations were measured during periods of low biological activity (LBA): 1 (<0.4-20) ng m(-3) and when polluted air masses were advected to the sampling site: 2 (<0.2-24) ng m(-3). DMA(+) and DEA(+) are the most abundant organic species, second only to MSA, detected in fine marine particles representing on average 11% of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA)fraction and a dominant part (35% on average) of the water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON). Several observations support the hypothesis that DMA(+) and DEA(+) have a biogenic oceanic source and are produced through the reaction of gaseous amines with sulfuric acid or acidic sulfates. Moreover, the water-soluble fraction of nascent marine aerosol particles produced by bubble-bursting experiments carried out in parallel to ambient aerosol sampling over the open ocean showed WSON, DMA(+), and DEA(+) concentrations always below the detection limit, thus excluding an important primary sea spray source.
DOI 10.1021/es8018385
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