Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Carr, P. J.,Glynn, R. W.,Dineen, B.,Kropmans, T. J.
2010
June
A pilot intravenous cannulation team: an Irish perspective
Published
()
Optional Fields
19
1010
27
Peripheral intravenous cannulation (PIVC) is a potentially painful and distressing procedure for patients, and is traditionally carried out by medical personnel. A university hospital in Ireland was chosen to initiate a pilot intravenous (IV) cannulation team, to ascertain whether this procedure could be performed effectively by a team of nurses. The team was introduced to support the implementation of the European working time directive (EWTD). A team of four registered general nurses, led by a senior phlebotomist, provided PIVC. Request books were placed on each ward and data was recorded before and after each insertion. A constantly increasing percentage of first-time cannulation success is displayed from the first five months of the study. In-depth analysis on an orthopaedic ward reveal a preference for distal site insertion and routine change at 72 hours. IV teams performing IV cannulation can effectively reduce insertion rate attempts, and potentially offer a solution to the manpower issues arising as a result of implementation of the EWTD.Peripheral intravenous cannulation (PIVC) is a potentially painful and distressing procedure for patients, and is traditionally carried out by medical personnel. A university hospital in Ireland was chosen to initiate a pilot intravenous (IV) cannulation team, to ascertain whether this procedure could be performed effectively by a team of nurses. The team was introduced to support the implementation of the European working time directive (EWTD). A team of four registered general nurses, led by a senior phlebotomist, provided PIVC. Request books were placed on each ward and data was recorded before and after each insertion. A constantly increasing percentage of first-time cannulation success is displayed from the first five months of the study. In-depth analysis on an orthopaedic ward reveal a preference for distal site insertion and routine change at 72 hours. IV teams performing IV cannulation can effectively reduce insertion rate attempts, and potentially offer a solution to the manpower issues arising as a result of implementation of the EWTD.
0966-0461 (Print) 0966-04
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=20622770http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=20622770
Grant Details
Publication Themes