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Redman, M. P.,Williams, R. J. R.,Dyson, J. E.
1996
Unknown
Monthly Notices Of The Royal Astronomical Society
Clumpy ultracompact H II regions. II. Cores, spheres and shells from subsonic flows
Published
()
Optional Fields
280
661
666
The authors have modelled ultracompact H II regions (UCHIIR) in terms of steady subsonic ionized flows in a clumpy medium. Mass loss from neutral clumps allows the regions to be long-lived. The authors examine the form of global flows for different dependences of the volume mass injection rate, qÀô, on radius and Mach number, and describe the solutions in detail. The authors find that three observed UCHIIR morphologies are reproduced with these models. Mach number independent flows that include a radial variation can give centre-brightened core-halo morphologies. Mach number dependent flows reproduce naturally the uniform UCHIIR morphology. In a hybrid model, including subsonic and supersonic flows, the authors allow a supersonic wind to shock in the ionized region. The ionized subsonic gas has a high density and so dominates the emission. The shell produced has a velocity structure very different from that of fully supersonic models. Several morphologies of spherical UCHIIR can be understood in terms of these various models; however, kinematic data are crucial as a discriminant between them.The authors have modelled ultracompact H II regions (UCHIIR) in terms of steady subsonic ionized flows in a clumpy medium. Mass loss from neutral clumps allows the regions to be long-lived. The authors examine the form of global flows for different dependences of the volume mass injection rate, qÀô, on radius and Mach number, and describe the solutions in detail. The authors find that three observed UCHIIR morphologies are reproduced with these models. Mach number independent flows that include a radial variation can give centre-brightened core-halo morphologies. Mach number dependent flows reproduce naturally the uniform UCHIIR morphology. In a hybrid model, including subsonic and supersonic flows, the authors allow a supersonic wind to shock in the ionized region. The ionized subsonic gas has a high density and so dominates the emission. The shell produced has a velocity structure very different from that of fully supersonic models. Several morphologies of spherical UCHIIR can be understood in terms of these various models; however, kinematic data are crucial as a discriminant between them.
0035-87110035-8711
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996MNRAS.280..661Rhttp://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996MNRAS.280..661R
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