Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Satyam, A,Kumar, P,Cigognini, D,Pandit, A,Zeugolis, DI
2016
October
Acta Biomaterialia
Low, but not too low, oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding accelerate extracellular matrix deposition in human dermal fibroblast culture
Published
Altmetric: 2WOS: 9 ()
Optional Fields
In vitro microenvironment Hypoxia Excluding volume effect Molecular assembly In vitro organogenesis Cell therapy STEM-CELL DIFFERENTIATION IN-VITRO REGENERATIVE MEDICINE FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN MMP-2 ACTIVATION HYPOXIA PROCOLLAGEN EXPRESSION BIOMATERIALS TGF-BETA-1
44
221
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A key challenge of in vitro organogenesis is the development in timely manner tissue equivalents. Herein, we assessed the simultaneous effect of oxygen tension (0.5%, 2% and 20%), foetal bovine serum concentration (0.5% and 10%) and macromolecular crowding (75 mu g/ml carrageenan) in human dermal fibroblast culture. Our data demonstrate that cells cultured at 2% oxygen tension, in the presence of carrageenan and at 0.5% serum concentration deposited within 3 days in culture more extracellular matrix than cells grown for 14 days, at 20% oxygen tension, 10% serum concentration and in the absence of carrageenan. These data suggest that optimal oxygen tension coupled with macromolecular crowding are important in vitro microenvironment modulators for accelerated development of tissue-like modules in vitro.Statement of SignificanceTo enable clinical translation and commercialisation of in vitro organogenesis therapies, we cultured human dermal fibroblast at 2% oxygen tension, under macromolecular crowding conditions (75 mu g/ml carrageenan) and at low foetal bovine serum concentration (0.5%). Within 3 days in culture, more extra cellular matrix was deposited under these conditions than cells grown for 14 days, at 20% oxygen tension, 10% FBS concentration and in the absence of crowding agents. These data bring us closer to the development of more clinically relevant tissue-like modules. (C) 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
10.1016/j.actbio.2016.08.008
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