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Schettler, G., Romer, R.L., O'Connell, M. and Molloy, K.
2006
June
Boreas
Holocene climatic variations and postglacial sea-level rise geochemically recorded in the sediments of the brackish karst lake An Loch Mór, western Ireland
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Optional Fields
NORTH-ATLANTIC OSCILLATION CONTINENTAL-CRUST NORWEGIAN SEA SWISS PLATEAU INIS-OIRR ICE-SHEET TEMPERATURE VARIABILITY EUROPE POLLEN
35
674
693
Palaeohydrology of the brackish karst lake An Loch Mor (Inis Oirr) was reconstructed based on its 11 600 year sedimentation record. Low calcareous early Holocene sediments, characterized by high TOC contents and deposited at generally low accumulation rates, show a gradual decrease upwards in the concentration of the siliciclastic sediment until c. 7000 cal. yr BP. From c. 9000 cal. yr BP, sediment accumulation became increasingly dominated by the deposition of autochthonous calcite and organic matter. The deposition of autochthonous calcite and its chemical composition (Ca/Sr, Ca/Mg) are determined by the subsurface inflow of freshwater from the catchment of the lake and by the balance between freshwater and seawater influx. During the early Holocene, the lake mainly received input of sea salt by sea-spray. The sediments document the further development from seasonal towards the onset of diurnal infiltration of seawater at c. 5100 cal. yr BP. At that time, the relative sea level must have risen nearly to its present level in Galway Bay. Diurnal seawater infiltration during high tides was controlled by freshwater input. Freshwater inflow from the catchment gradually increased with human impact on local vegetation (EVPT decrease). Permanent diurnal seawater infiltration in concert with this general freshwater increase made the geochemical sedimentation record highly sensitive to changes in annual precipitation. We use information from the palynological record to interpret geochemically inferred freshwater inflow variations in terms of dry and wet climatic periods and document distinct century-scale successions between wet and dry climatic episodes for western Ireland.
DOI 10.1080/03009480600690811
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