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Vuollekoski, H,Kerminen, VM,Anttila, T,Sihto, SL,Vana, M,Ehn, M,Korhonen, H,McFiggans, G,O'Dowd, CD,Kulmala, M
2009
January
Journal Of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres
Iodine dioxide nucleation simulations in coastal and remote marine environments
Published
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Optional Fields
CLOUD CONDENSATION NUCLEI ATMOSPHERIC SULFURIC-ACID PARTICLE FORMATION BOUNDARY-LAYER AEROSOL FORMATION HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEATION TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOLS ORGANIC CONTRIBUTION SIZE DISTRIBUTION MOLECULAR-IODINE
114
Aerosol dynamical box model simulations of coastal new particle formation were performed in order to investigate the nucleation and growth mechanisms in this environment. In the simulations the nucleating vapor was assumed to be iodine dioxide (OIO). Both Eulerian and Lagrangian type simulations were made and compared with observations. We tested three nucleation mechanisms: kinetic nucleation of OIO (K x [OIO](2)), activation of clusters by OIO (A x [OIO]) and sulphuric acid-induced activation of clusters containing OIO (B x [OIO] x [H2SO4]). All the nucleation mechanisms provided reasonable results, although the growth of particles due to condensation is inadequate in kinetic nucleation cases as compared with experimental measurements. Growth of newly formed particles could be assisted by any low-volatility vapors should their concentration exceed 10(9) cm(-3). Using the obtained values of coefficients K, A, and B we found that nucleation driven by iodine compounds in remote marine areas is possible, but by OIO and H2SO4 alone, only a minor fraction of newly formed particles is likely to reach detectable sizes. Owing to the scavenging by coagulation with background aerosol particles, few of them will likely reach climatically relevant sizes by acting as seed particles for other low-volatility vapors. In order to elucidate the significance of our results, more detailed measurements of OIO source and photolysis rates, dimensions of precursor areas, and particle chemical composition are needed.
ARTN D02206
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