Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Birlea, SI,Breen, PP,Corley, GJ,Birlea, NM,Quondamatteo, F,OLaighin, G
2014
February
Physiological Measurement
Changes in the electrical properties of the electrode-skin-underlying tissue composite during a week-long programme of neuromuscular electrical stimulation
Published
Altmetric: 2WOS: 9 ()
Optional Fields
tissue impedance human skin electrical properties stratum corneum electrode-skin interface neuromuscular electrical stimulation DIELECTRIC-PROPERTIES BLOOD-FLOW PHYSIOLOGICAL-RESPONSES SHOULDER PAIN FREQUENCY IMPEDANCE HEMIPLEGIA RESISTANCE THICKNESS COMFORT
35
231
252
Particular neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) applications require the use of the same electrodes over a long duration (>1 day) without having access to them. Under such circumstance the quality of the electrode-skin contact cannot be assessed. We used the NMES signal itself to assess the quality of the electrode-skin contact and the electrical properties of the underlying tissues over a week. A 14% decrease in the skin's stratum corneum resistance (from 20 to 17 k Omega) and a 15% decrease in the resistance of the electrodes and underlying tissues (from 550 to 460 Omega) were observed in the 14 healthy subjects investigated. A follow-on investigation of the effect of exercise-induced sweating on the electrical properties of the electrode-skin-underlying tissue composite during NMES indicated a correlation between the decrease in the resistance values observed over the course of the week and the accumulation of sweat at the electrode-skin interface. The value of the capacitance representing the dielectric properties of the skin's stratum corneum increased after exercise-induced sweating but did not change significantly over the course of the week. We conclude that valuable information about the electrode-skin-underlying tissue composite can be gathered using the NMES signal itself, and suggest that this is a practical, safe and relatively simple method for monitoring these electrical properties during long-term stimulation.
10.1088/0967-3334/35/2/231
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